Hands-on Research

JUNE 19, 2024, 13h-18h15
Lethbridge-Layton-Mackay Rehabilitation Center

This half-day event is of particular relevance to healthcare professionals, clinical managers/administrators, researchers, graduate students, research professionals, users and the general public, as well as decision-makers interested in physical rehabilitation.

Registration mandatory

Please register for this Scientific Half-Day of Rehabilitation by filling out the online FORM

Places are limited, so please respect the registration deadline of May 20, 2024.

Keynote speaker

We are pleased to welcome Jonathan Jarry, Scientific communicator from McGill University, as our keynote speaker.

We look forward to your participation and enriching contribution to this scientific day dedicated to rehabilitation. Please circulate this e-mail to anyone who may be interested in our event.

**We are also delighted to inform you that snacks will be offered to participants during the day.

Program at a glance

12:30 pm – 4:30 pm Block 1: keynote speaker and flash talks
12:30 pm – 1:00 Welcome block 1
1:00 pm – 1:20 pm Opening remarks
1:20 pm – 2:15 pm Keynote speaker

Jonathan Jarry, science communicator
Not all studies are created equal: How to tell good science from bad!

2:15 pm – 3:15 Flash talks

Creative presentations, in simple and accessible language, to explain key concepts of an innovation

3:30 pm – 4:30 pm Poster session & appetizers
4:00 pm – 6:00 pm Block 2: interactive workshops
4:00 pm- 4:30 pm Welcome block 2
4:30 pm – 4:45 pm Introduction & presentation of “Coup de cœur” prize
4:45 pm – 6:00 pm Interactive workshop session

 

Discover physical rehabilitation through 9 workshops where you can learn while having fun

6:00 pm – 6:15 pm Closing remarks

Detailed program

Keynote speaker

We welcome as keynote speaker Jonathan Jarry, a science communicator for Office for Science and Society – McGill University who will presented:

“Not All Studies Are Created Equal: How to Tell Good Science from Bad”

The media loves to report that a new study shows that we were wrong about something… that is, until yet another new study contradicts the previous one. Are all these studies to be believed or are some better than others? This will be a crash course in how to evaluate the scientific literature.

Interactive workshops

Touch, Play, Move … Come and enjoy our interactive workshops for all ages! We offer you “Hand-on research”. In this spirit, we invite you to discover physical rehabilitation through 9 workshops where you can learn while having fun. Depending on your interests, you can choose one or more workshops.

Challenges and Laughter for all ages.  It’s more fun in a group! Workshops are for everyone, including children and teens, with 3 workshops for children aged 7 and up, and several for teens aged 16 and up.

Click on the + sign to read the description of each workshop.

Stimulating cognition: a matter for everyone

At 4 stations, discover activities to stimulate cognition through fun games. Also, discover activities you can use with those around you, especially the elderly:

  • Wii station
  • Paper-pencil & IPad” activity
  • Cognitive games
  • Music activity with instruments

Time: 15 minutes per station
Age: 16 and over

Explore the different interventions of the driving and vehicle adaptation program for both driver and passenger.
Participants will have the chance to visit 4 stations:

  • Adapted motorcycles: Driving a motorcycle with a physical disability? Yes, it’s possible!
  • HI-TECH Driving Controls. We’re the only ones in Quebec to have them!
  • Consultation service: Adapted car seats for children with special needs
  • New driver approach: Driving simulator and adapted commentary driving

Time: 15 minutes per station
Age: 16 and over

In this interactive workshop, get hands-on with Tomat and discover the web through an interactive tactile map of a web page. Discover how the Tomat Browser makes web browsing more accessible to visually impaired users.

Discover the collaborative development process behind this open-source innovation and contribute your ideas to shape its future.

Time: 10 to 15 minutes
Age: 16 and over

To raise participants’ awareness of the difficulties of driving a motorized wheelchair. A real first-time challenge!

Participants will have the chance to visit 2 stations:

  1. Timed motorized wheelchair competition in the form of a short trip with an agility test to test participants’ motorized wheelchair driving skills.
  2. Static station to try out motorized accessories.

Time: 10 minutes
Age: 16 and over

Come and experience a unique moment where technology replaces the spoken word!   Laughter guaranteed 😄

Realize that no longer being able to communicate orally is a daily challenge, and learning with technology is often underestimated.

Time: 15 minutes for a game – 2 players and spectators
Age: 8 and over

Come and experience music therapy by playing and exploring the instruments that certified music therapist Tiana Malone uses with young people.

Music therapy can support and enhance a variety of therapeutic goals for people with sensory, motor and/or language impairments.

Time: 15 to 20 minutes
Age: children and parents, adults are welcome

The aim of this workshop is to raise awareness and promote the dance therapy approach among clinicians and the general public.

This approach has been developed to stimulate certain skills in children with neuro-visual disorders.

Time: 20 minutes
Age: 7 and over

Join us for a virtual consultation between a user and a clinician.

The workshop will demonstrate the different options for the “Take Care” application and how the clinician can act if the data is qualified as out of range, as well as the procedure to follow.

Time: 20 minutes
Age: Adult

A workshop to raise awareness about neurovisual disorders.

This animated film detects visual field disorders (hemianopsia). Sit down in front of the screen and try it out!

Time: 20 minutes
Age: Adult

Flash communications

Accessibility of orientation and mobility services for people with vision loss: The possibility of Telehabilitation. (language: English) Tosin Ogdengbe, École d’optometrie, Univeristé de Montréal 

Improving healthcare experiences for adults with neurodiversity. (language: English) Sean Stirrup, Centre Miriam, Azrieli Clinic for the Neurodivergent 

Co-creation, implementation and evaluation of BRAVER app to support therapy transfer from rehab setting to home. (language: English) Emily Lecker, Centre de réadaptation Lethbridge-Layton-Mackay  

Exploring how people with low vision and blindness use mobile apps for navigation. (language: English) Joe Nemargut, Université de Montréal, CRIR (INLB, LLM) 

A fresh look at interprofessional dysphagia evaluation and management across the continuum of stroke care. (language: English) Kate McClurg, Clemence Kao, Christina Vinokuroff, CIUSSS Centre-Ouest-de-l’Île-de-Montréal 

Innovative application of a classic treatment in patients with progressive apraxia of speech.  (language: French)  Liziane Bouvier, School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, McGill University; CRIR; IURDPM 

Direct access physiotherapist in the emergency department (ED) (language: English) Lynn Gillespie, Chief, Jewish General Hospital (JGH) Physiotherapy Department 

Development of a gamified leisure activity mobile application for youth with disabilities: A human-centered design approach. (language: English) Ebrahim Mahmoudi, School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, McGill University 

Poster Sessions

Titles of poster presented in French (1 to 7)

1. Evaluation of hearing perception in adolescents and adults with behaviorally and objectively adjusted cochlear implants by Sandra Fortin & al.
2. Deaf culture and the delivery of rehabilitation services to deaf adults; the perspective of healthcare professionals in Quebec by Sandy Poulin & al.
3. Interventions aimed at improving taste and smell: A scoping review by Sarah Hadjeres & al.
4. Optimizing Transitions in Care and Outcomes for Individuals with Acquired Brain Injuries: How can digital health support care transitions? By Dorra Rakia Allegue & al.
5. Adaptation of the COOK configuration interface: the TRIAGE method by Mélanie Amaral Dos Santos& al.
6. Advocacy for quality rehabilitation care and services in times of pandemic: A policy brief by Perrine Ferré & al.
7. Conducting a realist review in rehabilitation: challenges and solutions by Nay El Hajj & Cindy Louis-Delsoin

Titles of poster presented in French (8 to 25)

8. Adapting to change: Coping experiences with the vision rehabilitation process by Joshua Simmonds & al.
9. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Brain Injury Visual Symptom Survey Questionnaire into French, a questionnaire for screening visual impairments after a brain injury by Nathalie Naman & al.
10. Step & Speak: Unlocking functional potential through the Interdisciplinary Treadmill Program (ITP) by Arlene Rosenberg & al.
11. Identifying Food literacy assessment dimensions for people with low vision by Mahboubeh Esmati & al.
12. Psychometric properties of the mini-balance evaluation systems test and physical function measures in patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome/Hypermobility Spectrum Disorders by Soomin Lee & al.
13. Accessibility and communication support training modules for long-term care providers to improve care for older residents living with deafblindness by Walter Wittich & al.
14. A systemic crisis response model for persons with ID and or ASD by Daniela Mireles & al.
15. Strength in community: Exploring equity-oriented strategies for care beyond the clinic Nicole George & al.
16. Differences in individual VF-14 scores between age-related macular degeneration and other vision impairments by Severina Ferreira-Lopes & al.
17. The Effectiveness of medial pivot knee arthroplasty implants at improving gait in patients with knee osteoarthritis: An interim analysis of an RCT by Nicolas Herrera & al.
18. Empowering stroke care: harnessing Digital Health Interventions among clinicians for better individuals’ outcomes by Alice Misana & al.
19. Agency and D/deaf Individuals: A Cultural, service-delivery model for informed intervention and mental health services by Emmanuela Tedone
20. From theory to practice: Mapping the landscape of Artificial Intelligence in stroke– A scoping review by Lee Hill & al.
21. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health: Perspectives from individuals with lived Experience of deafblindness from across the six World Health Organization regions by Shirley Dumassais & al.
22. Mapping accessible employment pathways for youth with disabilities by Amelia Hagelstam Renshaw & al.
23. Improving interdisciplinary communication: A focus on the reinforcement of completion and optimal use of a preexisting standardized tool and the effect of this compliance on patient and interdisciplinary team satisfaction with communication at Catherine Booth Hospital by Hanaa El hajj & al.
24. The effect of sex-specific footwear on cutting kinematics in soccer by Karen Chen & al.
25. Monitoring childhood disability rights to inform health and social policy by Ananya Chandra & al.
26. Elaboration of an interprofessional collaborative model for dysphagia management at the Jewish General Hospital by Aisha Khan & al.

If you have any issues with the registration forms, please contact naima.abbadi.ccomtl@ssss.gouv.qc.ca

Organizing committee

Sara Ahmed: Full Professor, School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, McGill University, CRIR researcher
Andréanne Guindon: Program Manager – SHERPA University Institute and Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation of Greater Montreal (CRIR)
Shari Joseph:Coordinator, Rehabilitation Services (Miriam Home and Services)
Ebrahim Mahmoudi Kojidi:
CRIR student representative for the Constance-Lethbridge site
Lucyna Lach: Associate Professor, School of Social Work, McGill University, CRIR researcher
Gina Mills: Assistant to the Director, Directorate of Rehabilitation and Multidisciplinary Services
Frédérique Poncet: Assistant Professor, School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, McGill University; Adjunct Professor, School of Optometry, Université de Montréal, CRIR researcher
Shawn Robbins:
Associate Professor, School of Physical & Occupational Therapy, McGill University, CRIR researcher
Chantal Robillard: Adjunct professor, Department of Sexology, UQAM,  Adjunct Professor, School of Optometry, Université de Montréal, Clinical Research Coordinator, CRIR researcher
Joshua Simmonds: CRIR student representative for the MAB-Mackay sites
Katerine Tremblay: Coordinator, Rehabilitation, Physical Disability – MAB and Mackay sites (Lethbridge-Layton-Mackay Rehabilitation Centre)
Walter Wittich: Associate Professor, School of Optometry, Université de Montréal, CRIR researcher

Scientific committee

Sara Ahmed: Full Professor, School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, McGill University, CRIR researcher
Erica Fagen: Planning, Program & Research Officer for professional practice
Ebrahim Mahmoudi Kojidi: CRIR student representative for the Constance-Lethbridge site
Natalina Martiniello: Professor, School of Optometry, Université de Montréal, CRIR researcher
Frédérique Poncet: Assistant Professor, School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, McGill University; Adjunct Professor, School of Optometry, Université de Montréal, CRIR researcher
Shawn Robbins: Associate Professor, School of Physical & Occupational Therapy, McGill University, CRIR researcher
Chantal Robillard: Adjunct professor, Department of Sexology, UQAM,  Adjunct Professor, School of Optometry, Université de Montréal, Clinical Research Coordinator, CRIR researcher
Walter Wittich: Associate Professor, School of Optometry, Université de Montréal, CRIR researcher

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